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CURRENT TEAMS

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS
1998 - Chase Field
ATLANTA BRAVES
1997 - Turner Field
1966 - 1996 Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium
1953 - 1965 County Stadium (Milwaukee)
1915 - 1952 Braves Field (Boston)
1914 - 1915 Fenway Park (Boston)
1876 - 1914 South End Grounds (Boston)
CHICAGO CUBS
1916 - Wrigley Field
1893 - 1915 West Side Grounds
1891 - 1893 South Side Park (II)
1885 - 1891 West Side Park
1878 - 1884 Lake Front Park
1876 - 1877 23rd Street Grounds
CINCINNATI REDS
2003 - Great American Ballpark
1970 - 2002 Cinergy Field
1890 - 1970 Crosley Field
COLORADO ROCKIES
1995 - Coors Field
1993 - 1994 Mile High Stadium
LOS ANGELES DODGERS
1962 - Dodger Stadium
1958 - 1961 Memorial Coliseum
1913 - 1957 Ebbets Field (Brooklyn)
1898 - 1912 Washington Park (II) (Brooklyn)
1891 - 1897 Eastern Park (Brooklyn)
1890 - 1891 Washington Park (I) (Brooklyn)
MIAMI MARLINS
2012 - Marlins Park
1993 - 2011 Sun Life Stadium
MILWAUKEE BREWERS
2001 - Miller Park
1970 - 2000 County Stadium
1969 Sicks Stadium (Seattle Pilots)
NEW YORK METS
2009 - Citi Field
1964 - 2008 Shea Stadium
1962 - 1963 Polo Grounds (II)
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES
2004 - Citizens Bank Park
1971 - 2003 Vetrans Stadium
1938 - 1970 Connie Mack Stadium
1887 - 1938 Baker Bowl
1883 - 1886 Recreation Park
PITTSBURGH PIRATES
2001 - PNC Park
1970 - 2000 Three Rivers Stadium
1909 - 1970 Forbes Field
1891 - 1909 Exposition Park
1884 - 1890 Recreation Park
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
2006 - Busch Stadium (III)
1966 - 2005 Busch Stadium (II)
1920 - 1966 Busch Stadium (I)
1893 - 1920 Robinson Field
1892 Sportsman's Park (I)
SAN DIEGO PADRES
2004 - Petco Park
1969 - 2003 Qualcomm Stadium
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS
2000 - AT&T Park
1960 - 1999 3Com Park
1958 - 1959 Seals Stadium
1889 - 1957 Polo Grounds (II) (New York)
1883 - 1888 Polo Grounds (I) (New York)
WASHINGTON NATIONALS
2008 - Nationals Park
2005 - 2007 RFK Stadium
1977 - 2004 Stade Olympique (Montreal Expos)
1969 - 1976 Parc Jarry (Montreal Expos)

DEFUNCT TEAMS

BALTIMORE ORIOLES
1892 - 1899 Oriole Park (III)
BUFFALO BISONS
1884 - 1885 Olympic Park (I)
1879 - 1883 Riverside Grounds
BROOKLYN HARTFORDS
1877 Union Grounds
1876 Hartford Ball Club Grounds (Hartford Dark Blues)
CINCINNATI REDS
1880 Bank Street Grounds
1876 - 1879 Avenue Grounds
CLEVELAND SPIDERS
1891 - 1899 League Park
1889 - 1890 National League Park (II)
1881 - 1888 Recreation Park (Detriot Wolverines)
CLEVELAND BLUES
1879 - 1884 National League Park (I)
INDIANAPOLIS BLUES
1878 South Street Park
INDIANAPOLIS HOOSIERS
1887 - 1889 Seventh Street Park
KANSAS CITY COWBOYS
1886 Exposition Park
LOUISVILLE GRAYS
1876 - 1877 Louisville Baseball Park
NEW YORK MUTUALS
1876 Union Grounds
PHILADELPHIA ATHLETICS
1876 Jefferson Park
PROVIDENCE GRAYS
1878 - 1885 Messer Park
ST. LOUIS BROWN STOCKINGS
1876 - 1877 Grand Avenue Park
ST. LOUIS MAROONS
1885 - 1886 Union Grounds
SYRACUSE STARS
1879 Newell Park
TROY TROJANS
1882 Troy Ball Club Grounds
1880 - 1881 Haymaker's Grounds
1879 Putnam Grounds
1878 Milwaukee Base-Ball Grounds (Milwaukee Grays)
WASHINGTON NATIONALS
1886 - 1889 Swampoodle Grounds
WASHINGTON SENATORS
1892 - 1899 Boundary Field
WORCESTER RUBY LEGS
1880 - 1882 Driving Park at Agricultural County Fair Grounds

The National League was formed in 1876 by a group of owners lead by William Hulbert, who was the National League President until his death in 1881. These owners wanted a stronger league and wanted the power returned to them from the players. They created and organization with a president, secretary/treasurer, and board of directors. They also charged each team $100 a year for doing business with them. To show that they had the power at the end of the inaugural 1876 season, the clubs from the two largest cities, New York and Philadelphia, figured that they had lost enough money and didn't make their final road trip, so the league kicked them out. One of the most relevant things the National League did was institute a reserve clause that guaranteed a player to play for a particular team. This was the catalyst for other leagues such as the American Association and Union Association to spring up. This clause was obviously repealed with free agency. This structure has served the National League well as they are the longest lasting league in baseball.

2002-17 Paul Healey.